Sibti’s Anay De: A sarcasm-loaded message

Published: December 13, 2012
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If given the opportunity, Sibti would not mind an offer from Bollywood. PHOTO: HAMAD KHAN, SYED RAZA ARIF

If given the opportunity, Sibti would not mind an offer from Bollywood. PHOTO: HAMAD KHAN, SYED RAZA ARIF

If given the opportunity, Sibti would not mind an offer from Bollywood. PHOTO: HAMAD KHAN, SYED RAZA ARIF
If given the opportunity, Sibti would not mind an offer from Bollywood. PHOTO: HAMAD KHAN, SYED RAZA ARIF
KARACHI: 

The last few months have been very successful for the Pakistani music industry. New music videos were released on Facebook and on local music channels. The new pop culture emerging is a break from the stereotypical Indian item numbers. This new number pokes fun at the gradual invasion of Bollywood into the lives of listeners and musicians.

Anay De is one of the finer rock numbers to have been released by a new, young musician (Sibtain), better known as Sibti. With this song, he manages to send a serious message in a subtle manner, while keeping the audience entertained and aware.

Sheila teri jawaan hai, Munni bhi teri badnaam hai, ooper baitha Hanuman hai, aray apnay andar bhi tau ek Khan haiAnay de, anay de, hamay bhi anay de,” (Your Sheila is young, Munni disgraced, Hanuman is upstairs, we’ve got a Khan somewhere in us too… let us come, let us come).

The video depicts Sibti waking up, shaving his beard and mimicking the moustache of Bollywood actors. He goes on to worship the pictures of stars like Anil Kapoor, Aamir Khan, Salman Khan and Vidya Balan. The song takes a hilarious turn when Sibti appears in front of the jury of a show called Bharat Star and tries to impress them with his dance moves; the song moves onto Indian Premiere League (IPL) and Indian cricketers.

“There is no sarcasm in that verse,” clarifies Sibiti. “I am a big fan of Tendulkar!”  He then adds “There is an element of sarcasm in the song. Producers in general showcase the same talent, there are better musicians than the usual run of the mill talent [in India and Pakistan],” he explains, referring to the lyrics.

Popular for consistently being different, Sibti is not happy with the present day Pakistani music industry and believes that our musical growth has come to a standstill.

“The mainstream has not gotten over commercial music like Jal and Atif Aslam,” he says, clearly unimpressed.

“I am not saying that [their music] was bad; it worked back then. But it’s our responsibility to take the music industry forward,” he adds.

In the Pakistani underground music scene, Sibti is a well known name. Songs like Peshawar Ki Larki and Naughty Boy — which he launched in the first season of Uth Records with RamLal — are quite popular. He hopes Anay De is taken in good humour, as he has no reservations against Bollywood. “There is no personal attack on Indians or anyone for that matter, and people should take it in good taste,” he says, adding that he would accept an offer from Bollywood if the opportunity arose.  “If the music that I am supposed to make is different and involves travelling and exploring Indian culture then why not?”

Sibti has a few tracks ready for release; he plans to hit the studio and is all set to release some heavy rock music soon. “All of my tracks will be angry rock. If an album is not ready for release, then an extended play is certain,” he says excitedly.

What his ‘angry rock’ songs will sound like is yet to be determined, but keeping Sibti’s track record in mind, one can certainly hope that they will be full of surprises. As far as Bollywood producers are concerned, Sibti is a gem of a musician with a very good understanding of folk beats, rhythm and rock music — something that Bollywood is desperately trying to get into without much success.

Published in The Express Tribune, December 14th, 2012.          

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Reader Comments (11)

  • Huma
    Dec 13, 2012 - 10:26PM

    so wheres the video link

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  • Zalmai
    Dec 13, 2012 - 11:44PM

    “As far as Bollywood producers are concerned, Sibti is a gem of a musician with a very good understanding of folk beats, rhythm and rock music — something that Bollywood is desperately trying to get into without much success.”

    Bollywood has successfully incorporated folk, rock, pop, sufi, qawalli, jazz, bhangra, funk, bossa nova and many other genres for decades. They definitely don’t need any help with their music. Ravi Shankar, A R Rahman, Zubin Mehta, Zakir Hussain, Allah Rakha, Trilok Gurtu, Karsh Kale and many others are well known Indian musicians worldwide.

    Recommend

  • Ali S
    Dec 14, 2012 - 12:57AM

    He appeared on Uth Records two years ago and is often featured on ET but I haven’t heard a single decent song from this guy yet.

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  • gp65
    Dec 14, 2012 - 5:38AM

    ““As far as Bollywood producers are concerned, Sibti is a gem of a musician with a very good understanding of folk beats, rhythm and rock music — something that Bollywood is desperately trying to get into without much success.”

    What is the basis of the claim that

    a) Bollywood is desperate

    b) It has failed to incorporate folkbeaths,rhythm and rock into its music?

    Plus Sibti is perfectly within his rights to poke fun at Bollywood but why then should Bollywod music directors work with someone who treats them condescendingly?

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  • Bee
    Dec 14, 2012 - 9:48AM

    Gr8 work boi!!

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  • Logicola
    Dec 14, 2012 - 10:52AM

    @Huma
    open http://www.google.com/videohp
    search for “Anay De”
    you will find many link for this video

    Recommend

  • Huma Shah
    Dec 14, 2012 - 3:05PM

    @Logicola…. thanks! but Tribune should have provided the link!

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  • Iceman
    Dec 14, 2012 - 3:15PM

    This guy’s a real artist. If you can’t handle the eccentricity, go back to your commercial recycled garbage

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  • NM
    Dec 14, 2012 - 4:22PM

    Joke of the day: “The last few months have been very successful for the Pakistani music industry.”
    its in shambles my friend..the videos and audio productions are all self-funded..with artists not recieving a single penny from the channels..or paid shows..
    it may be wiped off soon..if the gig scene remained dead

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  • Karan
    Dec 14, 2012 - 6:55PM

    horrible!!!HORRIBLE!!!

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  • gp65
    Dec 15, 2012 - 2:28AM

    “adding that he would accept an offer from Bollywood if the opportunity arose”.
    Sure and he would accept the ofer to marry Priyanka Chopra also. Questuo is has anyone made the offer?

    ““If the music that I am supposed to make is different and involves travelling and exploring Indian culture then why not?”
    “Different? Different from what? India has a very wider range of music already available within its borders. PAkistani singers are not asked to “make different music”, they come as playback singers. Someone has composed the songs, they just lend their voice to it. Neither Shafqat, nor RFAK nor Alif Zafar have been asked to compose songs for Bollywood. While Bollywood did accept a couple of Asif Atlam’s popular hits, most subsequent songs of Asif too have been playback only.

    “The last few months have been very successful for the Pakistani music industry”
    Please define success. Revenue figures from Pakistani music industry are not available so would like to know what is your yardstick?

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