Students of media school explore domestic violence and slavery in short films

Published: January 30, 2011
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SAAMPT students screened their short films for the first time on Saturday. PHOTO: COURTESY SAAMPT

SAAMPT students screened their short films for the first time on Saturday. PHOTO: COURTESY SAAMPT

KARACHI: Students of the South Asian Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Television (SAAMPT) screened their short films for the first time on Saturday.

In a span of not more than two minutes each, the students explored subjects such as domestic violence, homosexuality, slavery, humour and desensitisation due to violence in a total of 15 films shot on 16mm.

The black-and-white films were shown through a conventional telescope while the colour ones were converted to “telecine” and then shown on CD. For these first- and second-year students, the experience of handling everything from concept-making, directing and writing to cinematography, lighting and editing was thrilling to say the least.

For Hussain Afzal, the real learning experience came from using the conventional film roll. “With the roll, we could only take one or two retakes so we had to be perfect,” he explained. “We edited the film manually using blades and a slab instead of using premiere and seeing through the movie scope. These rolls were then sent to Berlin to develop and that’s how it all happened.”

Ramsha Zia, a second-year student of Szabist Media Studies programme who was part of the audience, said that it was a learning experience since the films were shot on film instead of using digital tools. She found the black-and-white films “just okay” but thought that the colour ones were “a lot more dynamic” in content and style.

The students seemed to have discovered their specialisations as was evident in their choice of subject. Sara Jamil focused on emotions and messages and her two short films were appreciated by the audience. In her first film, which was a silent depiction of ‘hope’, Jamil showed a desolate man finding light at the end of a tunnel. Through ‘Facade’, Jamil showed a clown and his different faces in an effort to highlight the different personalities, the same person adopts in society.

Jamil felt, however, that filmmaking is a difficult field for women. “Women are usually taken so lightly that even when they make a super hit film, they will still have to start from scratch for the next one,” she said.

Her colleague, Imtesal Rahat showed light humour short flicks while Abdul Rehman wanted to make Bollywood-like “masala” films. Abdul Rehman said that he left filmmaking schools in the UK to join SAAMPT, mainly because he found opportunities to gain early experience.

All the students agreed that experience and portfolios were far more important than a degree in filmmaking. Daneyal Sufi completed his Bachelors in Media Sciences from the University of Lancaster, UK, but joined SAAMPT before going for a postgraduate degree.

“It is the only school in the country which focuses on filmmaking and allowed us to start making films right from the beginning,” he said. He believed that this institution will give him the opportunity to develop a good portfolio for a university in Hong Kong, where he wishes to pursue his Master’s after taking inspiration from Jackie Chan’s words “Hollywood is the Xerox copy of Hong Kong cinema”.

SAAMPT dean Daniyal Ali Khan was proud to see that his students had performed better than his expectations. By giving his students, good quality equipment and confidence, he believed he is unleashing the talent that other media schools in the country are failing to exploit. “It is a field in which people don’t want to see your degree but your portfolio and that is what we focus on,” he said.

Khan felt that filmmaking as a talent is fizzling out because students don’t get trained at the right time and “ultimately end up becoming a VJ or an anchor instead of a director.”

Although he is teaching a small group, Khan seemed happy with his pupils. “My students are 10 years ahead and those in the media sciences programmes of other schools are 50 years behind.”

Published in The Express Tribune, January 30th, 2011.

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Reader Comments (7)

  • yasir ali khan
    Jan 30, 2011 - 6:39PM

    SAAMPT is the only place where you get hands on training in the first semester on Film camera.where as keeping the theory in balance.Recommend

  • Salman Abedin
    Jan 30, 2011 - 10:00PM

    “My students are 10 years ahead and those in the media sciences programmes of other schools are 50 years behind.” Dear express tribune, is this responsible reporting?Recommend

  • Jan 30, 2011 - 10:00PM

    What about all the men who are victims of women’s domestic violence? Women’s domestic violence against men is grossly under reported, while male victims are still routinely being ignored by the taxpayer funded domestic violence industry. Credible research overwhelmingly shows that the ratio of domestic violence is at least 50/50 between women & men. Go to Fiebert Bibliography. According to one study by researchers who work at the CDC, in 70 percent of domestic violence incidents, where the d.v. is not mutual, it’s women who initiate the d. v. Go to Respecting Accuracy in Domestic Abuse Reporting. Click on the link under the red & blue pie chart. D.v. law follows a gender feminist agenda over facts & does great harm to many innocent men & also many violent women. Go to Youtube, “Los Misandry.” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SAmOxvudpF8Recommend

  • Jan 30, 2011 - 10:03PM

    What about little children? Deaths of little children, killed by their mothers is egregious, yet the taxpayer funded, domestic violence industry disingenuously tries to make us believe that women don’t abuse men too. According to the U.S. Dept of Health and Human Services and DOJ statistics, more kids are killed by neglect and abuse in a year (1,760 in 2007), than all the female intimate partner homicides in a year. Mothers are the single largest group of kid killers, according to HHS, and they have a rate twice that of fathers. Nowhere near the money is spent to protect kids from kid killing mothers as is spent by the domestic violence industry to protect women. The taxpayer funded d.v. industry is a bastion of misandrist vilification, falsely accusing men of being the overwhelming cause of d.v., and empowering violent women to commit further domestic violence. The corruption of the taxpayer funded, domestic violence industry is characterized in “Los Misandry” at Youtube.Recommend

  • Jan 30, 2011 - 10:04PM

    Domestic violence will never end as long as the whole truth about it is misrepresented to comply with feminist ideology. American V.P. Biden recently called violence against women, “the very worst abuse.” The very worst abuse is valuing one life less than another for having been born the wrong gender. Under domestic violence law, the wrong gender is men. Shelter and services are virtually non-existent for male victims of domestic violence. Options out of a bad relationship, that women have, are often not available to men. Men wind up gender profiled and falsely accused by the taxpayer funded, domestic violence industry, because of gender feminist ideology controlling the d.v. industry. Men are often battered by domestic violence, and then battered again by the taxpayer funded, domestic violence industry as shown in “Los Misandry” at Youtube.Recommend

  • Jan 31, 2011 - 3:27PM

    Correction: First year students ONLY (1st & 2nd semester). Pls note, its been one full year of SAAMPT since january 2010. SAAMPT was established in Jan last year. Thank you.
    “For these first- and second-year students, the experience of handling everything from concept-making, directing and writing to cinematography, lighting and editing was thrilling to say the least.”Recommend

  • Ethen
    Jan 31, 2011 - 11:19PM

    “My students are 10 years ahead and those in the media sciences programmes of other schools are 50 years behind.” That’s freakin true!!!Recommend

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