Back to old politics

Published: July 28, 2013

The writer is an independent political and defence analyst. He is also the author of several books, monographs and articles on Pakistan and South Asian Affairs

Pakistan is a land of contradictions. Formal and ritualistic aspects of democracy seem to have strengthened over the years. The elected PPP government at the federal level managed to survive for five years despite pressures from the superior judiciary, the military and the opposition. Now, new elected governments are in office at the federal and provincial levels. Two general elections, held in 2008 and 2013, have brought forward elected civilian governments. Despite complaints about the May 2013 general elections, the results have been accepted by all political parties. Now, Pakistan is holding the presidential elections on July 30.

However, the substance and quality of democracy is poor. There is a deficit of democratic culture and operational democracy. After two general elections in 2008 and 2013, one expects a greater reflection of democratic norms not only in the conduct of political parties and leaders but also at the societal level. This implies an increased emphasis on liberal constitutionalism, the rule of law, equal citizenship, religious and cultural tolerance and protection of life and property of citizens. These norms exist in a highly selective manner. Religious and cultural intolerance is on the rise, intensifying sectarian mindset and killings.

Political parties are invariably the fiefdoms of the top leaders who manifest authoritarian traits in political management, preferring loyalty over professionalism and competence. The leaders are more inclined to promote their relatives and highly obedient loyalists to counterbalance the activists with an autonomous disposition.

Consequently, the gap continues to increase between democratic rituals and democratic soul and character. Four recent political developments show that in some respects, Pakistani politics is reverting to its old ways.

First, the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) and the Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM) have once again entangled in rough polemics, accusing each other of wrongdoings. A couple of years back, Imran Khan launched a major effort to malign Altaf Hussain on a host of counts. Now, in 2013, when the MQM and Altaf Hussain are under pressure from the police and intelligence authorities in the United Kingdom, Imran Khan found this a convenient opportunity to relaunch his onslaught against Altaf Hussain. Both sides are on the way to launching defamation cases against each other. This increases conflict in politics, which is not helpful in addressing the problems of the common people.

Second, Nawaz Sharif and the PML-N have selected a political nonentity as their presidential candidate. No doubt, Nawaz Sharif appointed him governor of Sindh for some months during his earlier term. Mamnoon Hussain does not have much standing in the PML-N, not to speak of Pakistani politics.

Nawaz Sharif has selected a person with no autonomous political clout who will thus look towards Nawaz Sharif in all matters. The presidency will lose its autonomous stature and the prime minister will become all powerful, combining formal and informal powers.

This is going back to December 1997, when Nawaz Sharif selected a loyalist but a political lightweight,  judge of the Supreme Court but he did not have any political standing inside or outside the party. He was a personal selection of Nawaz Sharif who betrayed Nawaz Sharif when General (retd) Pervez Musharraf overthrew his government by deciding to continue as the president until Pervez Musharraf forced him out of office in June 2001. We are going to have another Rafiq Tarrar in the presidency. This fits well with the operational norms of Pakistani politics where loyalty is assigned the highest premium.

Third, the PML-N is about to revive the tradition of importing people from abroad for high offices. These people return to Pakistan with a suitcase and serve in high office. When they are out of that office, they pick up their suitcase and leave the country. Mooen Qureshi and Shaukat Aziz are good examples of leadership brought in from abroad. (Both got Pakistani passports and national identity cards after coming to Pakistan). Hafiz Shaikh, who returned to Pakistan to hold a key cabinet position, is essentially based in the UAE. Now, the PML-N is said to be thinking of appointing a person as governor of the Punjab who has given up his British citizenship to ‘serve’ the people of Pakistan.

Fourth, it is unfortunate that the Pakistan Peoples Party and its allies have pulled out of the presidential elections. This decision, triggered by the Supreme Court’s orders to advance the election date at the request of the PML-N, has made the presidential election controversial. The new president will find it difficult to enjoy undisputed stature and we may also return to the old practice of the opposition boycotting or disrupting the presidential address to parliament.

There is a need of doing some dispassionate thinking on why Pakistan’s political leaders and parties cannot change their old habits and want to twist the democratic process to their advantage rather than rectifying their political behaviour on the basis of the spirit of democracy.

The PML-N has got, once again, a heavy mandate. However, the electoral mandate will be valid only for four to six months. After that the PML-N can sustain itself comfortably in power only by acquiring performance legitimacy. The government will have to deliver services to people and improve the quality of their lives. This cannot be ensured by returning to old political ways and preferring loyalists for key positions.

There is a need to go beyond the loyalists and sycophants for advice. Compare their advice with the opinions of professionals, independent minds as well as the stakeholders for evolving a realistic thinking on the problems that afflict Pakistan, which include terrorism and extremism, a faltering economy, energy shortages and how to maintain a stable relationship with the military.

Published in The Express Tribune, July 29th, 2013.

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Reader Comments (15)

  • iftekhar hussain
    Jul 28, 2013 - 10:06PM

    For the last several years, dozens of so called ‘Analysts’ have cropped up in the electronic media. It is sometimes really entertaining to listen to their prophecies. Now here is another new one by the writer about Mamnoon Hussain.Relax and enjoy. Recommend

  • Zohaib
    Jul 29, 2013 - 12:10AM

    The writer brilliantly ignored MQM’s part in the MQM-PTI tussle, and only mentioned PTI.
    hurling accusations is a small crime compared to murder.
    The ‘conflict’ which is no doubt not good will only end when one party gives up its militant ways

    Recommend

  • Multan
    Jul 29, 2013 - 12:12AM

    Mamnoon Hussain is a better choice than Rafiq Tarar, Without 58-2B President of Pakistan will be a ‘dummy’ person.

    Recommend

  • Jadoon
    Jul 29, 2013 - 1:58AM

    @ Iftekhar: Can you name a better political analyst than Hassan Askari Rizvi in Pakistan. He didn’t crop up from anywhere and he is going to stay here for good.

    Recommend

  • Mannan
    Jul 29, 2013 - 2:11AM

    And you have a high standing in journalism?

    Not a PMLN supporter, just a fair guy.
    Recommend

  • Akhtar
    Jul 29, 2013 - 4:05AM

    Good analysis

    Recommend

  • Max
    Jul 29, 2013 - 4:15AM

    @iftekhar hussain: If you woke-up just this morning, please do not blame the author of the article. I know him for last forty plus years, first as a professor and now as a freelance columnist and an analyst.
    By the way, you are perhaps the only one impressed by Mamnoon Hussain. You also sit back, think (if you can) and relax.

    Recommend

  • Ricky
    Jul 29, 2013 - 8:06AM

    A scholarly Op Ed and great political analysis by ET. Of course there is not a single man in the Sharif family who is not awarded the loot and the third time they are worse than the first two times in nepotism.
    Of course their nominee is a lightweight who cannot even be elected for any office. He has no constituency just like Moeen Qureshi and Aziz. Yet he is representing the smaller province! How could Sharif claim to represent Sindh by acquiring the services of a few politicians and ignore the two big parties of Sindh? The two opposition candidates are far superior and that is why Sharif and SC rushed the elections.

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  • thathamusa
    Jul 29, 2013 - 8:32AM

    Thank you sir for writing the story. I have been reading you since long. Have read some of your books and most of your articles. This is good analysis. However please also analyse why PPP has never won in Punjab after 1977. I very strongly feel that PPP’s mandate was always stolen in Punjab as the establishment could not bear Punjab to be ruled by non Punjabi even if it had to give in to PPP (analysis of Nazir Naji in one of his TV columns) at federal level. I agree with him as it is easy to see that party has only come to power when there was a crisis situation in country.

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  • asim
    Jul 29, 2013 - 11:33AM

    @iftekhar hussain:
    Some analysts, Journalists are serving as proxy for the elite class. They are the one hiding truth and mastermind for the repressive apparatus. How to expose them and bring them to public justice?

    Recommend

  • TrueBlue43
    Jul 29, 2013 - 1:23PM

    @iftekhar hussain: Do you even know the gentleman ….. are you 15 or what …. how can you allow such comments ET …… having a different opinion is ok but that should not justify any bad upbringing issues ……. Sad

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  • Polpot
    Jul 29, 2013 - 5:15PM

    The more things change in Pakistan…
    ++++++++++++++++++++
    the more they remain the same.

    Recommend

  • Kabir
    Jul 30, 2013 - 2:11AM

    If he is such a great analyst how come he can’t figure out “why Pakistan’s political leaders and parties cannot change their old habits and want to twist the democratic process to their advantage rather than rectifying their political behaviour on the basis of the spirit of democracy”?

    Recommend

  • butterfly
    Aug 11, 2013 - 11:07PM

    a very insightful analysis… without any bias, Mr. Rizvi has been highlighting the basic issues in Pakistan very aptly! clearly Pakistan is not ready for change…in fact far from it… pakistanis are still thinking that changing faces would bring change.. without a change in attitudes and learning from past mistakes and putting the country’s interesr first, change is ever more elusive!Recommend

  • butterfly
    Aug 11, 2013 - 11:25PM

    a very insightful analysis… without any bias, Mr. Rizvi has been highlighting the basic issues in Pakistan very aptly! clearly Pakistan is not ready for change…in fact far from it… pakistanis are still thinking that changing faces would bring change.. without a change in attitudes and learning from past mistakes and putting the country’s interesr first, change is ever more elusive!

    Recommend

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