Emperor Nero and the US

Published: April 4, 2012

The writer is Executive Director Jinnah Institute. The views expressed are his own

American humorist Will Cuppy penned satirical sketches of historical figures and called the work The Decline and Fall of Practically Everybody. Of Nero, the infamous emperor, he wrote: “In some respects Nero was ahead of his time. He boiled his drinking water to remove the impurities and cooled it with unsanitary ice to put them back again.”

Cuppy could have been talking about US foreign policy.

We are all agreed that relations between the US and Pakistan have nosedived. We are also told that the US is very keen to put matters right. Some evidence — counting out the CIA, Raymond Davis’ running around, unilateral raids, US forces that can’t differentiate between Taliban hideouts and army posts but deliver deadly accurate fire, and Dana Rohrabacher — suggests that such may be the case.

So, why does the US, Nero-like, use unsanitary ice to put the impurities back?

Washington has put a bounty of $10 million on the Jamaatud Dawa (JuD) chief Hafiz Saeed, announced by US Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs Wendy Sherman in India, on April 2. Meanwhile, a US State Department spokeswoman is supposed to have told the media that the announcement has not been made at India’s behest. The process is internal. This, of course, explains adequately the timing and place of the announcement and those trying to find an India angle could go take a hike, thank you.

But leaving all else aside, including the broader strategic issue of US-Pakistan relations, and agreeing also that Hafiz Saeed may not be Mother Teresa’s brother, we still run into problems. Consider.

A bounty presupposes someone who is a fugitive from law, or having been sentenced is absconding or having served a term and on bail has jumped the bail. The Hafiz does not fall into any of these categories. Everyone knows where he lives, he makes regular public appearances, there is no criminal case against him either in Pakistan or the United States.

There is no indication, apart from an internal, inter-agency process in the US, that the US government has indicted the Hafiz and taken the case to the court of law where due process has determined the man’s guilt. There is also no indication that the Hafiz has been notified of any such legal case against him. For all practical purposes this is an ex parte announcement which, legally speaking, given the process and sans standard legalities, is bogus.

The announcement then is a violation of international law, diplomatic norms and the fundamental rights of a Pakistani citizen. In fact, the entire process is against the judicial norms of the US itself and could not be applied to a US citizen.

But let’s park this thought and rewind. Hafiz Saeed was listed by the United Nations as a terrorist. What did he do? He filed a delisting request through the focal point arguing that his enlistment is a violation of the right to due process and is an arbitrary action influenced by the Indian lobby.

He categorically denied any alleged association with al Qaeda and Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT) and denounced the Mumbai attacks; challenged the veracity of the narrative summaries of reasons given by the Sanctions Committee; requested the Committee to delink the JuD from the LeT and issue a separate narrative of reasons, if any, with regards to JuD; argued that reliance on the allegations related to LeT and treating JuD as an alias is unfair and lacks reason and justification; declared that he is ready to confront the evidence related to the vague and conjectural allegations; stated that Courts in Pakistan have declared that there is no evidence of his involvement in Mumbai attacks or his connection with al Qaeda; apprised the focal group that JuD is not a proscribed organisation under Pakistani law.

Incidentally, the Hafiz’s representation was the first of its kind before the UN Focal Group. Since then the UN has changed the procedure and put an ombudsperson to deal with such matters. The Hafiz has instructed his counsels to approach the office of the ombudsperson for a de novo consideration of the delisting request which, I am told, is being finalised.

Meanwhile, two attempts by the government in Pakistan to put the Hafiz under confinement were quashed by the Lahore High Court for lack of evidence.

It is a legal truism that no person can be deemed guilty until due process has determined his culpability. The US action, which is executive in nature, flouts that benchmark and by targeting unilaterally a citizen of another state also signals that the United States’ internal, executive process is enough to override both the international law as well as the legal system of another state.

I am not sure if this approach is in any way conducive to stated efforts by the United States to improve relations with Pakistan.

It may be noted that this discussion has nothing to do with the guilt or otherwise of the Hafiz. He may be found guilty whereupon he must be punished as deemed by law. If the US has evidence that links the Hafiz to any terrorist acts, it must share that with Pakistan so the government can present a case against the Hafiz in a Pakistani court of law. The US has refused to bring itself under the jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court because the idea of a non-US court, even one mandated through a multilateral process remains anathema to the US. And yet, it finds its own internal, executive process to be enough to indict a citizen of another state.

Or perhaps the US is the ultimate reformer that likes all other states to be bound by multilateral treaty processes and international law but chooses to act unilaterally when desired so it can retain its freedom of action to shape the world according to its own interests.

Nero, Cuppy informs us, was also a reformer. He “renamed the month of April after himself, calling it Neroneus”. But, as Cuppy reminds us, “the idea never caught on because April is not Neroneus and there is no use pretending that it is.”

Published in The Express Tribune, April 5th, 2012.

on Twitter, become a fan on Facebook

Reader Comments (78)

  • Babloo
    Apr 4, 2012 - 11:27PM

    Farcical. Would Daood Gilani/Headley , be ever prosecuted and punished in Pakistan ?
    Will all the planners, who have been identified and audio evidense exists of their direct control of the 26/11 operations, be ever punished in Pakistan ?
    Pakistan has refused to even provide audio samples of the accused so that they can be matched with the recorded phone conversation with Kasav and other 26/11 attackers, as the attacks were taking place.
    The outrage and hysteria, that I see surrounding the Mr Saeed is reflective of the fact that Hafeez Saeed is very close to some.
    He is protected by the …..

    Recommend

  • Falcon
    Apr 4, 2012 - 11:29PM

    Interesting point of view. There is another article on Dawn that talks about how US has transferred prisoners to Europe over years for torture process (as part of ‘Rendition’ program). As a whole, I think US is not setting a good example by taking these short-cuts. However, I fear you have just invited the anger of liberal friends of ET and Indian brethren across the border. Good luck!

    Recommend

  • kaalchakra
    Apr 4, 2012 - 11:36PM

    Falcon

    Our Indian liberal brethren are incapable of anger. :)

    The funny thing is – one expected just this wonderful piece of writing from Ejaz Haider, but was surprised how quickly it came.

    This is the kind of liberalism that one can like, and most Indian liberals will never understand.

    Recommend

  • Syed Ali
    Apr 4, 2012 - 11:43PM

    @Babloo:
    So much about the audio evidence. Hafiz is giving press conference every other day and is openly giving public addresses. Buy a tape recorder and get done with the evidence.
    FYI: US has sensitive voice recorder technology to the extent it can trace it anywhere it would like to in the world, even if any such conversation happened over a cell or land line years ago.

    Recommend

  • Ali Tanoli
    Apr 4, 2012 - 11:44PM

    Ariel sharon of israel and Indra gandhi of india are big time killers of Muslims and Sikhs but
    no Bounty american put on them…

    Recommend

  • Babloo
    Apr 4, 2012 - 11:55PM

    @Syed,
    India already has all the evidense it needs to convict Hafeez Saeed in Indian courts. The audio evidense , requested from Pakistan, was suppose to be collected in a judicial setting and certified by a Pakistani judge , that’s because only then it would be admisable in Pak court. But what we have is a farcical drama on the prosecution of 26/11 planners with the state doing everything to protect them. Do npt forget, Daood Gilani ( son of a Pak ex-diplomat ) convicted in Chicago copurt has named Pak ISI officers among those who planned and controlled the 26/11 murderous attacks. Who are you trying to fool ???

    Recommend

  • Ali Tanoli
    Apr 5, 2012 - 12:04AM

    @Babloo
    Do u think all the Non muslims speaks truth only in the world …
    specially india and U.S.A in these matters …..>???????? i doubt it.

    Recommend

  • ashok
    Apr 5, 2012 - 12:06AM

    There is a famous saying in India, “aap tau baal ki khaal nikaal rahe ho” (you are removing skin of the hair); what Ejaz is doing “khaal mein se ball” (Plucking hair out from the skin)”.

    I call it “Paralysis with Over-Analysis”.

    In USA people use the term, “KISS” for “Keep It Simple Stupid”.

    Recommend

  • White Russian
    Apr 5, 2012 - 12:15AM

    Plausible deniability at work!
    Bogus all that may be, but no less farcical is posing that Hafiz has nothing to do eith LeT.
    It is quite an unrealistic expectation that super-power should always be playing fair, while we have all the freedom to play our little games. Pity though, that americans never act according to the wisdom preached to them by Mr Haider. No wonder they always end up looking stupid in his articles.

    Recommend

  • Abbas from the US
    Apr 5, 2012 - 12:21AM

    Osama Bin laden or Zawhiri have also never been tried by an American or any country’s court system. However an indictment under the US legal system and the international legal system for all security and police forces to cooperate and enabale the indicted person to be brought into a legal accounting.
    Hafiz Saeed has rights available to him under international law but the Governement of Pakistan under international legal obligations need to detain this person, call for a complete indictment to be made availabel and if meets all the legal requirements either turn the indicted criminal (terrorist in this case) to the country that has the indictment issued thru the countries legal system. I beleive an indictment in the Ferderal Court in New York exists against this person.

    Recommend

  • kaalchakra
    Apr 5, 2012 - 12:26AM

    Ali Tanoli

    This is precisely the point I made in a post that didn’t make it past the moderators. Before anyone can expect Pakistan to cooperate on Hafiz Saeed, the world must account for all the crimes everyone else has committed, as believed by the well-informed people of Pakistan. On this matter, all Pakistanis trust completely, as they must, their military and justice system – which must be convinced with the weight of the proof.

    So there is essentially no solution to this problem, except that which people choose to enforce.

    Recommend

  • Umer
    Apr 5, 2012 - 12:28AM

    He categorically denied any alleged
    association with al Qaeda and
    Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT) and denounced
    the Mumbai attacks;

    And you trust him why? Him being the leader of LeT is a historic fact. It all changed after 9/11 when terrorist organisations declared themselves as charities under different names. As for Mumbai attacks I am sure he would have readily accepted his guilt if he were involved; like any criminal would do.

    Recommend

  • Pollack
    Apr 5, 2012 - 12:34AM

    @Syed Ali: Voice samples taken without consent is not admissible in court since you can’t prove that the voice sample actually belongs to that person. Taking a voice sample requires the suspect and also an independent witness to the process. You are probably not well informed on how things work in societies which have laws and ..surprise…surprise….actually follow them.

    Recommend

  • Pollack
    Apr 5, 2012 - 12:37AM

    @Ali Tanoli: Well ..they will care if they are American Muslims or American sikhs. Dont get me wrong. I am not agreeing with your basic premise that Indra Gandhi killed Sikhs just because they were Sikhs or that Sharon killed Muslims just because they are Muslims. But that sort of thing happens in some places….some places very familiar to you.:-). You should look around.

    Recommend

  • G. Din
    Apr 5, 2012 - 12:46AM

    ISI cut a sorry figure with OBL as its ward. It is not going to be any different with this scoundrel. Sooner or later, America gets its man even if it has to wage a world war. Ask Hitler!

    Recommend

  • Thoughtful
    Apr 5, 2012 - 12:59AM

    It Is a bounty for information leading to conviction not a price on his head.

    Recommend

  • Sarah Khan
    Apr 5, 2012 - 1:17AM

    And this is how US tries to create more polarization and dissensions in a society.

    Recommend

  • Babloo
    Apr 5, 2012 - 1:20AM

    Meanwhile, professor Hafeez Syed, a practitioner of the religion of peace has this to say about India . “There cannot be any peace while India remains intact. Cut them, cut them so much that they kneel before you and ask for mercy,” he said once in one of his venomous hate speeches.
    Is this the man on whom Pakistan is going to bet its remaining shreds of any credibility ?

    Recommend

  • Sarah Khan
    Apr 5, 2012 - 1:26AM

    I am reading all the comments on the Hafiz Saeed related pieces, and I am horrified how blatantly some Pakistanis wish to hand this man over to US. Personally, I have never been inspired by Saeed, or i have no affiliations with him whatsoever, but i just stand by a general fact. If a US citizen kills two Pakistani men in broad daylight and is conveniently escorted away out of the country without a single scratch, thanks to our general apathy and spinelessness, then why are we Pakistanis so insistent on handing over our citizens to this country that is playing god and deems itself above all forms of law. You might be too cool and urban to be in terms with a man’s religious disposition or to agree with his viewpoint, but you must, for the sake of your lost sovereignty, stand by your people.

    Recommend

  • Bhindian
    Apr 5, 2012 - 1:33AM

    @Babloo, mate conspiracy theories don’t count as evidence and you can’t fool people with lies and all the “evidence” you’ve provided so far has been a complete joke. It is time indians stop overacting because this is not a bollywood movie.

    Recommend

  • Bhindian
    Apr 5, 2012 - 1:37AM

    @Babloo, by the way, even if Hafiz Saeed was behind Mumbai attacks do you actually think he would be dumb enough to personally be in contact with the attackers? lol seriously mate get a grip and come out of your imaginary world.

    Recommend

  • MarkH
    Apr 5, 2012 - 1:54AM

    @Syed Ali:
    No. Simple recordings of his speech are not useable. That has been explained elsewhere. What is required is a recording under the same method as the evidence held and you can bet he’s never going near that communication service again willingly.

    Recommend

  • Syed Ali
    Apr 5, 2012 - 2:08AM

    @Babloo:
    Please support your words with some facts. India gave 4 times documents to Pakistan which were presented in Pakistani Courts including Lahore High Court. None could stand the judicial standard that would allow Pak government to continuously detain or trial Hafiz. Most recently, Judicial commision from Pakistan visited India but as it always happens, Indian Gov refused to provide them access to the main culprit i.e Ajmal kassab. the comission had to return as such without any new evidence.

    Recommend

  • MarkH
    Apr 5, 2012 - 2:09AM

    …an addition to what I said before. Other recordings can be used to assess probability. Enough to be certain to the listener, or a person evaluating it. But matches have requirements for evidence in court. Example being, chances are anyone listening to the recording and him giving a speech would be able to say it’s a match. If that was enough, it’d be done. Courts usually work under the idea of “getting it right the first time.” The higher profile the person, the more pressure is put on the people who are investigating it for it to be air tight.

    The same goes for finger prints and DNA. Partial prints and partial DNA can lead an investigation to be fairly certain due to adding in other factors. The partial print/DNA may narrow it down to… 200 people (completely random number), and you could narrow it down by investigating and ruling out 199 of them. But it still doesn’t stand as definitive evidence like a full print or DNA match. It can actually get the prints and DNA to be thrown out completely by the court if the defense lawyer makes an attempt.
    They have to stand as definitive evidence alone to be used. It can be claimed to be misleading resulting in the defense accusing the prosecution of trying to make the jury bias through suggestion rather than hard evidence.

    That doesn’t mean anyone, even the defense, doesn’t believe it’s highly likely the person did it as “highly likely” is not acceptable grounds to cage a person and serves as reason to challenge convictions.

    Recommend

  • Prakash
    Apr 5, 2012 - 2:46AM

    Author is wrong that there are no case against Hafeez Sayeed in US court,There is class action suit filed by relative of US Citizen killed in the Mumbai massacre which is coming up for hearing.Headly in US court and Kasab in Indian court has spoken about his complicity in Mumbai Massacre.Do not forget Hafeez is founder of LeT,which no person can deny is involved in terrorist activities.Pakistan by allowing free movement and hate speech by Hafeez Sayeed, is endangering its relation with US and India and will never be able to wash the stigma of a Terrorist state.

    Recommend

  • Roflcopter
    Apr 5, 2012 - 3:07AM

    It seems indians are having hard time accepting facts. Great article Mr Ejaz

    Recommend

  • RR Iyer
    Apr 5, 2012 - 3:11AM

    Mr. Ejaz Haider:
    You have enormous talent and strategic insight. Why do you waste your time denying obvious facts which are visible to every unbiased person?
    It is very clear that Lashkar-e-Toiba is guilty of carrying out the Mumbai attacks and its leader is supported by powerful folks in Pakistan. Kasab, one of the 11 killers, sang like a canary. After denying that he was a Pakistani-remember Zaid Hamid the armchair warrior claiming that he was an Indian because of his wristband-we found his location and parents in Pakistan. There are 3 days of recordings traced back to Pakistan on live cellphone lines. Headley also gave his corroborative evidence. And yet, Pakistan is demanding more evidence!
    Please do not treat the world as idiots! It is just fine if you do not wish to take action against this terrorist. This will surely rebound someday on the defenseless people of Pakistan-this is already happening with the daily killings! But do not couch this with legalese-you are too smart for that! Unfortunately, I despair for Pakistan when its best minds-and you are a fine mind- indulge in farcical claims. Just say that you wish to protect your “strategic asset” and the world will understand.
    Best wishes, Mr. Haider!

    Recommend

  • Umer
    Apr 5, 2012 - 3:22AM

    @Ali Tanoli:

    Ariel sharon of israel and Indra
    gandhi of india are big time killers
    of Muslims and Sikhs but

    Any bounty on the Gojra culprits or those who kill or persecute Shias, Ahmadis, Christians and Hindus? That would be bounty over half the country, at least.

    Recommend

  • Anjaan
    Apr 5, 2012 - 3:23AM

    The author has raised a valid question on legality of lack of so called “proof” against Hafiz Sayeed, and the same is applicably to Osama Bin Laden also … !

    Was there any proof of OBL being involved in any terrorist activity, other than the fact that he was the top leader of Al Qaeda … ? Does that mean the US should have looked for a legally acceptable ground, instead of just eliminating him …. ?

    And in case proof was available, would the Pakistani establishment act any differently than how it acted in case of Dr. AQ Khan ….. ?Recommend

  • Ken Bryant
    Apr 5, 2012 - 3:30AM

    I think the Hafiz will wake up many times each night, hearing helicopters in his dreams.

    Recommend

  • Sandip khanna
    Apr 5, 2012 - 3:51AM

    Ejaz Haider could have done better than to come out in support of a known terrorist. Just goes to show how deep the ostrich has buried it’s head into the sand. It is obligatory on Pakistan government to hold this man to account given the evidence that has piled up against him. It’s another matter that the Pak govt. considers this man to be their asset. Some asset indeed! Pakistani establishment just doesn’t get as to what a hole they have dug for themselves. They are still banking on Pakistan’s indispensability to US end game in Af-Pak. Have they considered what would happen if US just decided to spend an extra few billion dollars but really gave it to Pakistan? With a tottering economy, can Pakistan afford it? Certainly the folks in Rawalpindi haven’t, since their knowledge of economy is as deep as Musharraf’s lies on the economy.

    Recommend

  • S
    Apr 5, 2012 - 4:24AM

    Bruce Reidel just made it clear that the US over the last year finally completed analyzing all the evidence it gathered from Osama Bin Laden’s hideout in Pakistan. It concluded Hafiz Saeed was absolutely hand in glove with Osama Bin Laden, and LeT (or JUD, the name doesn’t matter) is now very much a part of Al Queda’s world terror syndicate. In fact LeT is now the big brother in the relationship and AQ depends on it for financial and logistical help through Pakistan’s security establishment connections. (It’s not for nothing that in the week after OBL’s death the biggest eulogy to him came from the frothing mouth of who Ezaj Haider calles “the Hafiz”). This, and not some imaginative India-US-Israel nexus, is the reason why US finally upped the ante and put a bounty on any info leading to arrest or capture of Hafiz Saeed.

    Recommend

  • sadhana
    Apr 5, 2012 - 4:25AM

    Hafiz Saeed’s organisations have been collecting bounties on Indians since early 1990s if not earlier. To be outraged when US govt does the same for Hafiz Saeed is pure hypocrisy.

    Recommend

  • Shah
    Apr 5, 2012 - 4:59AM

    I am amazed by the nonsensical arguments made by some one so cerebral as Ejaz Haider.
    A mere play of words does not negate culpability of Hafiz Saeed. Ten million dollars is a lot of money. Mr. Saeed is a dead man walking. Just watch..his own clan is going to do him in.

    Recommend

  • Harry Stone
    Apr 5, 2012 - 5:06AM

    Being a PAK it is understandable the position you have taken it reflects much of what is wrong with PAK today. That position is one of half-truths and distortion of the facts. This so called “bounty” which is in fact a reward is about obtaining information that can be used against him to convict him in a court of law. If you are as learned and world wise as you present yourself to be, then you would know this is a very common course of action law enforcement in the developed world uses to build cases for prosecution. So we are back to being a PAK.

    You might do well to reference just what international laws are in play. As to the US overriding the legal system of PAK, I believe you would be hard pressed to make a case for that. PAK has more than ample opportunity to investigate and prosecute this individual. The truth of the matter is the majority in PAK view him as a hero because after all his actions lead to the killing of Indians and Jews. Where he made his mistake and where PAK will made its mistake is that Americans were killed. He has broken no PAK laws or laws that PAK is prepared to enforce. The US has no requirement at all to share anything with PAK.

    Please be clear on one point. Diplomatic norms do not apply when dealing with PAK. You settled that issue with your handling of Raymond Davis. That case was telling about not only the strength of your national government but spoke volumes of your judicial system.

    Yes the US does place value on its relationship with PAK but that value also has its limits. This does not seem to be something that PAK nor do you have any understanding of.

    Recommend

  • Harry Stone
    Apr 5, 2012 - 5:08AM

    @Ali Tanoli:

    We are focusing on killing Americans. The focus is not on muslins. But you would think the muslins would consider the possiblity that could lose before they start a war………Oh never mind it seems they want one with the US…….think they will win that one too?

    Recommend

  • Ashvinn
    Apr 5, 2012 - 5:30AM

    May Pakistan be blessed with thousands of hazeef saeed and his ilk. Brilliant article, the very best

    Recommend

  • vasan
    Apr 5, 2012 - 6:05AM

    When Pakistan could not convict even one terrorist in the courts, as confirmed by the army, for whatever reason it may be (mostly the fear factor), how on earth our friends across the border scream of judicial innocense of this scoundral, ie hafiz sayeed, Do they want all their judges to flee to S Arabia after passing the verdit(like the judge who pronounced the governor killer, guilty). Given this scenario, talking of legalities for these terrorists is all crap or denialism or protection by the establishment.

    Recommend

  • Babloo
    Apr 5, 2012 - 6:26AM

    I say this respectfully, Mr Ejaz seems to read many books but understands very little.

    Recommend

  • Wasil Arien
    Apr 5, 2012 - 6:35AM

    It appears from this article as if bounty on Saeed has come as a surprise. Pakistanis are no strangers to bounty practice. One of their late President made good money on capture of Ramzie Yousaf and Perviz Musharf proudly stated in his book In the line of Fire having made millions of Dollars in bounty receipts by capturing and handing over scores of alleged Talibans to USA. If bounty can only be offered after conviction through due process of law as asserted , then why someone like the author did not raise similar objections on bounty for OBL and his cohorts, some of which still stands Undoubtedly.the Pakistan justice system was given an ample opportunity to deal with the accused, but on finding the inability and complacency of the same the present offer appears to have been made.

    Recommend

  • Apr 5, 2012 - 6:45AM

    “A bounty presupposes someone who is a fugitive from law -” why read furtner? Mr. Haidar is quite aware that the bounty exists to collect evidence that will lead to prosecution but he deliberately chooses to distort the record and make a red herring out of it. This column raises more questions about its author than anything else.

    Recommend

  • plal
    Apr 5, 2012 - 7:09AM

    It is incorrect to say that there is no case against Hafiz Saeed in US.Relatives of US citizen killed in Mumbai massacre has lodged case against him and ISI.Hafiz went to Pakistani court to ask Pak govt to defend him in US court as they were defending ISI but it was refused.Pakistani govt knows very well that Hafiz Saeed and his brother in law, is the brain behind LeT,because this front was created by them. ISI wants it can provide all the required proof to prosecute him.It is imprudent on behalf of Pak govt to annoy both US and India for a terrorist mastermind like Hafiz Saeed.

    Recommend

  • American
    Apr 5, 2012 - 7:11AM

    Ejaz, in his eagerness to bash US policy, missed the important point… this is not a bounty to find, capture or kill. This is a bounty for information. Any body can offer a reward for information. There is nothing illegal about it, and nothing to do with US or Pakistani Law. I can offer a reward for information, for example, about which tooth paste Ejaz uses. Or vice versa.
    The real fun will begin now, when bounty hunters start funneling information from inside LeT to USA.Recommend

  • lucknow nabob
    Apr 5, 2012 - 7:12AM

    … excellent article …

    … actually, a very crude attempt to pressurise DPC to soften stance on the NATO Supply route … which the US is in a mad rush to get opened, and against which the DPC is creating hurdles in by creating public pressure on the Govt of Pakistsn …

    … as usial, a thoughtless step by the US … won’t work … because the international and Pakistani public opinion can clearly see the illegality of the step … already, it is being treated as a joke …

    Recommend

  • Mirza
    Apr 5, 2012 - 7:15AM

    The ISI and ISPR do not have to issue any statements.

    Recommend

  • Blithe
    Apr 5, 2012 - 7:24AM

    @ashok:
    Perhaps this article is too “complex” for your IQ level.

    ejaz has followed the Einstien saying:
    “keep things as simple as possible , but not simpler”

    Well-written piece!

    Recommend

  • kB
    Apr 5, 2012 - 7:29AM

    US is saying now that bounty has been fixed to get evidence and information about hafiz saeed that could prove him guilty..how would US react If pakistan put bounty on a US citizen to get information that could prove him guilty in future.do international laws allow all countries to put bounty on each others citizens?

    Recommend

  • Thinktank
    Apr 5, 2012 - 8:49AM

    Ejaz, buddy I lost all respect for you after reading this poorly reasoned write-up.

    I would like to think that there was a gun pressing against your head( by hafiz saeed himself) when you were writing this… But alas that does not seem to be the case.

    As somebody said, we will understand if you want to protect your ‘asset’ but don’t think that we are all fools. So long…buddy.

    Recommend

  • Ken Bryant
    Apr 5, 2012 - 8:56AM

    THe Hafiz will soon be dead and dropped in the ocean. Legal niceties can follow the act. Can you not read that in what the Americans have announced?

    Recommend

  • KR
    Apr 5, 2012 - 9:29AM

    Mr Haidar -

    There is more than meets the eye here.

    US sources have publicly stated that they know that Mr Hafiz and/or his organization was connected with the sheltering of Osama Bin Laden in Pakistan. It is also well known and even acknowledged publicly by Pakistani commentators that Mr Hafiz is able to move about freely only because of support he gets from the “establishment” ..( a strange term to refer to the Army !!). The bounty offered by the US is for solid information on the link between the “establishment” and Mr Hafiz .. through which the link between the “establishment” and Osama Bin Laden can be proved. Mr Hafiz is, by himself, not that important to the US.

    Regards

    Recommend

  • Bluejay
    Apr 5, 2012 - 9:47AM

    The magistrate,who sentenced Qadri for murder of Salmaan Tasir has vanished from Pakistan to save himself from Jehadi backlash.In these circumstances how any court will dare to look into hard evidence and convict Hafiz Said ?

    Recommend

  • Indi-Pop
    Apr 5, 2012 - 11:03AM

    First Pakistanis show such open support for terrorist masterminds like Mr Hafiz Saeed and then they complain about being singled out in international airports and why the world looks at them with suspicion! Isn’t it a matter of commonsense that Hafiz Saeed will never face genuine prosecution in Pakistan where he enjoys support of the army. International law is nothing but gibberish. When US wanted Osama which Convention of International Law did it follow to attack and kill him on a ‘sovereign’ soil?

    Recommend

  • Masood Raja
    Apr 5, 2012 - 11:17AM

    It is simple and clear< Hafiz Saeed did not commit any crime in the U.S or against the U.S neither he is wanted in the U.S.He is only suspect not guilty.It seems the the whole exercise to sentenced Dr Fai and now putting bounty on Hafiz Saeed’s head is to please New Delhi and twist Pakistan’s arm to obey and open NATO supply route for Afghanistan.Pakistan has rightly demended the proof or evidence against Hafiz Saeed to examine and bring him to justice if proven in the court of law.It is also advisable for the U.S administration to put equal amount of bounty for Indian Army’s ex colonel who was the mastermind of massacering 65 Pakistani passenger of Samjotha Express and who has been charged and convicted by the Indian Court.

    Recommend

  • wonderer
    Apr 5, 2012 - 12:38PM

    There is a very simple rule that applies here.

    No one can be convicted by any court of law if the prosecutor is a friend of the accused.

    This rule becomes all the more strong when the friendly prosecutor is also complicit in the crime.

    Recommend

  • ASHOK
    Apr 5, 2012 - 12:38PM

    @ Blithe wrote
    5 hours ago
    Reply
    @ashok:
    Perhaps this article is too “complex” for your IQ level.
    ejaz has followed the Einstien saying:
    “keep things as simple as possible , but not simpler”

    Thank you for reminding me of my lower IQ. Quantum Physics has taken a heavy toll of my IQ.

    I am however happy to notice that there are many readers with my level of IQ who think alike me about this article.

    Please don’t take me wrong as I am a fan of Ejaz since he was with DT.

    He blew it this time big way, in my humble opinion with low IQ.

    Recommend

  • Neraj
    Apr 5, 2012 - 1:36PM

    What is interesting is the way both Narendra Modi and Hafiz Saeed have been treated by the US…one has been denied a US visa allegedly on the ground of organizing a pogrom of minorities in the Indian state of Gujarat…even though Indian courts have found no evidence of his direct complicity
    the other that of Saeed who has been declared a wanted with a bounty of his head….to be precise the bounty is for information leading to his conviction, even though he has been absolved of all involvment in 26/11 in Bombay (Mumbai).

    ….if the move was to please India they would have done the same with Syed Salauddin, one of India’s most wanted …or there might have been a bounty on Azhar Masood as well… there is none…
    This move is essentially US interests specific… Saeed has grown to big for his boots…. impinging upon vital US interests with hgis calles to seal off US access to Afghanistan…hence the move …..

    Finally, a lesson for both India and Pakistan…whats the similarity between Narendra Modi and Hafiz Saeed? Both have been accused of complicity , yet both have been absolved by their own courts

    Recommend

  • Apr 5, 2012 - 2:34PM

    @American:
    “This is a bounty for information.”

    Maan, you are revealing Facebook’s trade secret. Their worth is in billions.

    Recommend

  • Ishant
    Apr 5, 2012 - 3:37PM

    No mention of the word “Kashmir”, this guy is getting better, good for him:))

    Recommend

  • Fahd Abbasy
    Apr 5, 2012 - 4:27PM

    excellent point of view

    y is it that US MARINES enjoy complete immunity around the world regardless of the severity of their crimes committed in any other country?

    We should stand up to US double standards

    Recommend

  • Ali Tanoli
    Apr 5, 2012 - 4:54PM

    @Harry stone
    israel and bombay is america????? by your logic or south sudan and zimbabwe too ????
    i did not get it man what we gonna give name to these/???

    Recommend

  • BlackJack
    Apr 5, 2012 - 5:09PM

    @Neraj:
    Secularism does not mean that you stop using common sense – and comparing denial of a US visa with a bounty for capture shows just that. I am no Modi lover, but comparing him to Hafiz Saeed is crazy (even comparing Bal Thackeray, the poster boy of the Hindu right in Pakistan, is downright ridiculous). There is not a single speech or video of Narendra Modi in the public domain which can be produced as evidence even of his dislike of Indian muslims, let alone that he inspired the Gujarat pogrom. The case that is sub-judice concerns whether his inaction allowed rioters a free hand to kill and plunder during that dark period (something that happens in Pakistan every couple of days) – if proven, he still needs to be punished. Hafiz Saeed speaks only of killing Indians and breaking India up; he is the founder of a terrorist organization that has killed hundreds of Indian civilians and soldiers (this includes Kashmiris btw). His bigotry and proof of inciting violence are available for anyone with an internet connection.

    Recommend

  • Umer
    Apr 5, 2012 - 5:11PM

    When Mumtaz Qadri can not be punished despite his admission and concrete witness against him then its unlikely Hafiz Saeed would ever be prosecuted in Pakistan. If anyone is considered a hero then they can get away with murder in Pakistan, literally.

    Recommend

  • wonderer
    Apr 5, 2012 - 5:21PM

    @Neraj:

    You have said, “…whats the similarity between Narendra Modi and Hafiz Saeed? Both have been accused of complicity , yet both have been absolved by their own courts”.

    There is a subtle difference if I may point out Sir. Hafiz Saeed cannot be convicted because his prosecutor is a close friend of his besides being complicit in the crime. He will be convicted and sentenced in any US or Indian court if handed over. And, Narendra Modi has not been “absolved” by any court yet. In fact he is yet to be prosecuted. It is not easy to pin down as powerful and wily a person as him, but the process is still on. There are many hopefuls working hard on his case, and feel confident they will get him.

    Comparing the two, I am certain Modi has learnt his lessons, whereas Hafiz will never as long as he lives.

    Recommend

  • Ali Tanoli
    Apr 5, 2012 - 5:28PM

    @Black jack
    yeah yeah when its come to other than muslims they all good or u can creat some nonsence
    logic too for them like Gandhi was better than Jinnah because i never said kashmir is our ATOOT ANKH ????

    Recommend

  • Yuri Kondratyuk
    Apr 5, 2012 - 5:52PM

    @Ali Tanoli:

    like Gandhi was better than Jinnah
    because i never said kashmir is our
    ATOOT ANKH ????

    How does one compare Gandhi and Jinnah based on your opinions on Kashmir?

    Recommend

  • kaalchakra
    Apr 5, 2012 - 6:13PM

    Neeraj, excellent thinking. I regularly accuse everyone I disagree with of being Hitler. The lesson for the whole world is to treat everyone as if they were Hitlers. They have all been accused – equally.

    Recommend

  • BlackJack
    Apr 5, 2012 - 6:19PM

    @Ali Tanoli:
    For a guy who has not said anything good about any non-muslim in this forum (or possibly ever) you may think me to be a kindred soul – you are mistaken. We have a lot of silly Hindus – and there is no point in defending them; people like Ashok Singhal and Pravin Togadia who are inspired to take up cudgels on behalf of a religion that has no need for their support (it has survived for at least 3 millenia and will continue to do so); characters like Bal Thackeray who have made permanent camp on the funny pages (he used to be a cartoonist, you know); and then there is Digvijay Singh and his ilk, for entertainment of a coarser variety. In fact, on account of being a Hindu majority country, we may even have more intolerant hindus than muslims on a absolute basis (I don’t know) – but I do know that growth of one feeds the other. You are not capable of processing all this, so continue to vent venom on hindus of the past and present – we can take it.

    Recommend

  • Ali Tanoli
    Apr 5, 2012 - 7:01PM

    @Black jack
    I have some very nice Hindus friends and i dont compare them to RSS or SHive sehna and i do respect all non muslims freedom fighters of india too but when things comes to attack whole muslims lot or whole islamic ummah then its called hate.

    Recommend

  • Imran Mohammad
    Apr 5, 2012 - 7:05PM

    Well written Ejaz !!!

    Recommend

  • BlackJack
    Apr 5, 2012 - 7:49PM

    @Ali Tanoli:
    Nobody is attacking the whole muslim lot – we don’t do that in India. The closest parallel to the RSS/ VHP/ Bajrang Dal gang is your JUI or JI – political/ semi-political units with a communal agenda – they don’t go to other countries and kill people. Shiv Sena’s origins are in dislike of South Indians, not muslims – they have no presence outside Mumbai and very little respect inside. Note these points down to avoid forgetting.Recommend

  • its (still) the economy stupid
    Apr 5, 2012 - 8:13PM

    The pot calling the kettle black. From global village point of view Pakistan is the one sliding towards anarchy and and may disappear lot before US will so who is the Nero, Pak establishment?. Pak budget deficit to GDP ratio is lot bigger than that of US. Nero (US) is the one who pays for budget deficit of Pakistan. Pakistan army is whatever because of support of Nero. Words are cheap and reality bites.

    Recommend

  • sadhana
    Apr 5, 2012 - 8:46PM

    Consider this to be Umrika’s proxy war – psychological proxy war, which takes no lives unlike Jallad ud Dawa’s proxy war which has killed 1000s.

    Recommend

  • DigiDoc
    Apr 5, 2012 - 9:08PM

    Of course, Hafeez is only a social worker, of course OBL was not in Pakistan, of course, the Jews and the Indian struck the World Trade Center….

    Recommend

  • Ali Tanoli
    Apr 5, 2012 - 9:34PM

    @Digi Doc
    Of caourse u never know in the world of global village.

    Recommend

  • Abbas from the US
    Apr 5, 2012 - 11:08PM

    @BlackJack:

    It wasn’t Modi’s inaction alone as there is evidence to suggest that he may have goaded on the rioters during that time. However the crux of the mater is Modi is still an elected official, that and possible future Prime Minister, that the US and Pakistan will have to deal with, if it so happens. Even if his electoral constituency may bank on incitement of hatred to achieve electiblity he may find it hard to overcome the views about him that already exist in much of the democratic world.

    Hafez Saeed is to date not an elected representative nor is there evidence that his chances of being elected based on his version of playing to extremism can ever vouch the majority in an electoral consittuency.His political views like muuch of the tent that the extemists have gathered in, named Difa e Pakistan is based on playing to Pakistani Muslim chauvanism.that the Pakistani Army thinks helps in getting a better deal witht the US, However when in comes to fascist politics they stand little chances of finding more than a token expression in the Pakistani parliament leave alone achieving majority.

    Recommend

  • abhi
    Apr 6, 2012 - 11:26AM

    so hafij saed has nothing to do with LeT, this is gem of a piece. I think if you find and replace Hafij Saed’s name with Osama Bin Laden in this article and LeT by Al Qaeda, the artice will still hold true and that is the beauty of Ejaj’s writing.

    Recommend

  • Butt
    Apr 6, 2012 - 3:25PM

    All those narrow minded people who are criticizing Hafiz saeed alongwith author of this article should open their eyes and read this article once more,it is intensely in their favor.
    A great approach adopted by the writer who quoted old examples and gave the reference of legal matters dealing with foreign most wanteds.

    Recommend

  • Harry Stone
    Apr 7, 2012 - 12:53AM

    It is encouraging that others see through the charade that he is presenting. The question becomes why write such dribble? The obvious answer he is an agent of the ISI and the organization he heads is a front organization for the state within the state.

    Recommend

More in Opinion